Australia’s RSPCA: Banning Breeds Won’t Reduce Attacks

By Editor
In Breed-Specific Legislation
Jun 19th, 2013
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Editor’s note: Also of note is that in a recent letter to the Minister for Agriculture and Food Security regarding Australia’s breed-specific law (BSL), the RSPCA said that it “does not believe that BSL is in any way effective in preventing or reducing dog attacks, or in protecting the public from dangerous dogs.”  And as ridiculous as BSL is, since it has long been known to be ineffective legislation, it’s even more ridiculous to say, as Minister for Local Government Tony Simpson does, that “pit bulls” have the greatest propensity to attack.  As we so often say, there is no such “breed” as a “pit bull” since a “pit bull,” by the media’s standards, could include countless medium- or large-breed dogs, plus their mixes, and lookalikes.  So how many actual breeds, their mixes, or lookalikes are included in so-called “pit bull” stats?  Who knows?  That’s the point.  A “pit bull” can be anything the media and those proposing BSL want it to be so that they can go on to ban or restrict any number of breeds and their mixes as they see fit.  Regardless, the RSPCA is absolutely right.  Judging from all the repeals of BSL in the U.S., Canada, and Europe based on statistics that showed that BSL didn’t reduce dog bites, it is well known that breed-specific legislation in any form does not reduce dog bites/attacks.

From InMyCommunity.com:

THE RSPCA is against breed specific legislation on the basis that banning certain breeds of dogs does little to reduce dog attacks, according to spokesman Tim Mayne.

“There was a case late last year where a six-year-old girl was mauled in Baldivis by five dogs,” he said.

“None of those dogs was on the banned dog list.

“It depends on how the dogs were trained or possibly not trained at all.” 

But Minister for Local Government Tony Simpson said NSW statistics show that pit bulls are the breed with the greatest propensity to attack.

Mr Mayne said the best way to reduce dog attacks was through training and socialisation.

“We often say it is ‘the deed, not the breed’ or another way of saying is ‘don’t blame the breed, blame who is behind the lead’,” he said…

 
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